Queen Elizabeth Journal I
“This is the Lord’s doing…”
Written by: Shawn Marie Morrow
               In the movie, Elizabeth, as well as in the book, “The Virgin Queen”, by 
Christopher Hibbert, there was a scene where Elizabeth declared “This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes” (60).  This was said right after Elizabeth was given the betrothal ring of her sister and announced the new Queen of England.  This scene was portrayed differently in the book and the film.  In “The Virgin Queen”, Elizabeth was said to be “sitting under an oak tree reading the Bible in Greek, disregarding the cold” when the message was delivered to her about becoming Queen, whereas, in the film, Elizabeth was in a room when her ladies went to get her to take her outside to be told of the news.  Hibbert and the director of the film had two different ideas about this setting.  
Hibbert felt the need to describe that moment as being cold while Elizabeth sat out in the cold under the oak tree.  This gives an image that symbolizes strength and how even when everything around Elizabeth is not in the best condition, she makes the best of it and still prevails.  This could also be a slight hint of foreshadowing of how she prevails through all situations, no matter how intense, during her time of reign.  The film has altered the context of this scene.  The film was probably altered because the director wanted to show a positive and new beginning using this scene.  The film portrayed 
Elizabeth becoming Queen as a positive new beginning by having the spring setting because spring represents and idea of “out with the old, and in with the new”.  
               The quote also helped shape the character development of Elizabeth.  It helped shape Elizabeth’s character with her reference to the being that put her in power, which she said was God.  When you think about The Great Chain of Being, God is at the top, then falls the King, who has rule over his people, then falls the Husband, who has rule over his household, and so on.  Elizabeth let it be known that she, herself, did not cause this to happen, but God did.  This infers that since God is at the top of The Great 
Chain of Being, that this power vested in her at that moment was real and for people not to go against it because if they did it would be as if they were going against God and His doing.  Elizabeth wanted to enforce this idea because the people viewed women as using passion over reason and body over mind when it came to ruling and making decisions, which made it difficult to deal with the thought of a woman having such a high position in society.  Also, since women are supposed to go  through the four phases of life, daughter to wife to mother to widow, she felt it necessary to say it was God’s doing just in case those phases did not  come into play with her own life, which they did not.  That phrase gives the audience/reader the illusion of power when her presence was seen, especially since her power was given to her by the most powerful Being there is.  This statement also adds to the storyline in a sense that Elizabeth is not considered just an illegitimate child anymore, now she is the Queen of England, and she let it be known that people were to respect her and not look down upon her.
               Another interesting though in the quote Elizabeth stated, “This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes”, is who is she referring to when she said “our” eyes.  
It seemed as if she was speaking for everyone around her as if she tried to make them see her thoughts and visions or tried to hypnotize them in a manner to feel that everything she said and did was right and unquestionable.  She also could have been referring to her own eyes along with God’s eyes, which means she viewed herself on a high pedestal along with Him.  In my mind, that question is still up for debate.
               In the movie, Elizabeth, as well as in the book, “The Virgin Queen” , by 
Christopher Hibbert, there was a scene where Elizabeth declared “This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes” (60).  This was said right after Elizabeth was given the betrothal ring of her sister and announced the new Queen of England.  This scene was portrayed differently in the book and the film.  In “The Virgin Queen”, Elizabeth was said to be “sitting under an oak tree reading the Bible in Greek, disregarding the cold” when the message was delivered to her about becoming Queen, whereas, in the film, Elizabeth was in a room when her ladies went to get her to take her outside to be told of the news.  Hibbert and the director of the film had two different ideas about this setting.  
Hibbert felt the need to describe that moment as being cold while Elizabeth sat out in the cold under the oak tree.  This gives an image that symbolizes strength and how even when everything around Elizabeth is not in the best condition, she makes the best of it and still prevails.  This could also be a slight hint of foreshadowing of how she prevails through all situations, no matter how intense, during her time of reign.  The film has altered the context of this scene.  The film was probably altered because the director wanted to show a positive and new beginning using this scene.  The film portrayed 
Elizabeth becoming Queen as a positive new beginning by having the spring setting because spring represents and idea of “out with the old, and in with the new”.  
               The quote also helped shape the character development of Elizabeth.  It helped shape Elizabeth’s character with her reference to the being that put her in power, which she said was God.  When you think about The Great Chain of Being, God is at the top, then falls the King, who has rule over his people, then falls the Husband, who has rule over his household, and so on.  Elizabeth let it be known that she, herself, did not cause this to happen, but God did.  This infers that since God is at the top of The Great 
Chain of Being, that this power vested in her at that moment was real and for people not to go against it because if they did it would be as if they were going against God and His doing.  Elizabeth wanted to enforce this idea because the people viewed women as using passion over reason and body over mind when it came to ruling and making decisions, which made it difficult to deal with the thought of a woman having such a high position in society.  Also, since women are supposed to go  through the four phases of life, daughter to wife to mother to widow, she felt it necessary to say it was God’s doing just in case those phases did not  come into play with her own life, which they did not.  That phrase gives the audience/reader the illusion of power when her presence was seen, especially since her power was given to her by the most powerful Being there is.  This statement also adds to the storyline in a sense that Elizabeth is not considered just an illegitimate child anymore, now she is the Queen of England, and she let it be known that people were to respect her and not look down upon her.
               Another interesting though in the quote Elizabeth stated, “This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes”, is who is she referring to when she said “our” eyes.  
It seemed as if she was speaking for everyone around her as if she tried to make them see her thoughts and visions or tried to hypnotize them in a manner to feel that everything she said and did was right and unquestionable.  She also could have been referring to her own eyes along with God’s eyes, which means she viewed herself on a high pedestal along with Him.  In my mind, that question is still up for debate.

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